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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
issues. this is the energy department's largest clean up anywhere in the united states. trying to take those 56 million-gallons of radioactive sludge that were in underground tanks. they are trying to turn that into solid glass. it is a massive project. how does this work? >> well the 17 self-tanks are distributed over quite a few square miles with an intricate net of pumps and pipes. when it is pumped to facility that i was previously supporting, we would then treat that waste chemically to get some of the more dangerous constituents out of it and then after we had treated it chemically we would put it into a melter with glass heat it up to high temperatures. >> the tanks that were underground were beginning to leak. they were old and the danger was some of them were fairly close to the colombia river and there is fear that somehow some of that radioactive material could get into the river. >> it is a fear based on reality. the single shell tanks which were actually decommissioned in the 40s and 50s, those tanks are known to have been leaking into the environment for years. we have co
? >> yes, some of them will work, there's no question about that. it's just a question of how much energy is going to be put into the device to get it to work. what's going to be the most energy efficient way to do this, because remember, we have to get the craft up there that's going to do the work, we have to give it capability to maneuver around in space. once the technology that's going to be used to remove something from orbit, one of the ideas of attaching a tether so it builds friction and pulls the object down is not such a bad idea, because it doesn't require a lot of material to do that. if you could just push something out of orbit, that might not be a bad idea, because it may not require a large energy budget to make that work. you keep the expenses down in energy and materials and get the job done, it's just that those methods are slow and there's a lot of material that needs to be cleaned up. if there was a faster way to do it, that might be better. >> boy, that's certainly a big problem. nasa's budget was just announced or at least what they're hoping for the budget the nex
things for art. >> i don't put any energy into being a success. my strategy is to wait for something from heaven. >> i'm a guy who dug this. >> this is incredible. >> i had ideas for ages that i've never gotten to try. i want to create a stays that transforming. >> jeffrey join us from los angeles. the film's director and producer. jeffrey, good to have you with us. you followed him and he built these incredible artistic caves. he does it all by hand. he doesn't use power tools. he does it all by himself. >> he starts with a mountainside. there is a particular material that he can work in that has a combination of a malible i wil o it, and he can recognize this material. and he can see from the outside of the mountain the shape inside. and he starts digging in one direction and creates these cathedral like spaces over the course of months or years. >> one of the caves that he has finished has book shelves, doors and all sorts of details. how livable are the spaces? >> that one is the most livable of the caves that he's created. it is also wired for electricity and it has internal plumbing
for himself. he does things for art. >> i don't put any energy into being a success in the world. my strategy is to wait for something from heaven. >> hi, i'm the guy that dug the cave. >> i've had ideas for ages that i've never gotten to try. i want to create a space that's transformative. >> jeffrey, good to have you with us. >> thank you for having me. >> you follow raul paulette as he creates these caves, he does it all by himself. can you describe his work for people who haven't seen the film? >> well, he starts with a mountain side. there's a particular material that he can work in that has the combination of a malleablity to it and also a firmness so that it will keep its shape. and he can recognize this material. and he can see from the outside of the mountain the shape inside. and he starts digging in one direction and creates these cathedral hike spaces over the course of months or years. >> and one of the caves he has finished has bookshelves and doors and all sorts of details. how livable are the spaces? >> that one is the probably the most livable of the caves that he's created.
,000,000,000 in energy subsidies to the ukraine because those subsidies are likely to be taken away because of an imf package. there is a real fear of what an imf loan package means, a structural adjustment package, huge cuts to the poorest in society to the sort we saw in greece and elsewhere, future unrest and the u.s. is quite a wear that when countries go down the road of imf loans, you can get even more unrest. another interesting thing about that energy subsidy is a lot of that money is going to end up in moscow because it's moscow who sells much of ukraine its fuel. in washington, they are quite a wear they are giving potentially a billion dollars to moscow. >> just how far is the u.s. supposed to go in supporting ukraine? at what point is it going to run up against opposition in congress? >> there is a lot of -- a lot of support for financial aid and financial loans to ukraine. however, the senate majority leader, harry reid said let's keep an idea on what europe wants. this is mainly a european issue. if europe isn't all for sanctions -- and they are not because they are scared of losing al
a mention here is the focus we are seeing on the issue of the u.s. as an exporter of energy. i think the longer this spat over here goes on, the more we are going to hear about that u.s. issue here. of course, i just might add that europe has been trying to get off of its dependency on russian gas for quite awhile now, so this issue is height ended. >> if the conflict stays contained in crimea, does everything go away as far as investors are concerned? >> no. no. not at all. this is a geo-political issue. the crimea is an integral part of the ukraine. the prime minister said he is not going to give up the crimea without a fight. >> means the tension is unlikely to lessen any time soon. so, while the heart of the spat, this argument, this tension, if you like, might be confined to the crimean region, the repercussions elsewhere -- we have talked about a few of those just now -- are massive. so, the market is unlikely to turn a blind eye. bear in mind this is the 5th bigtest exporter in the world. we have talked about the gas supply t whether it is confined there or not, the geo-polit
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)